COVID Pandemic
Has Led to Higher Blood Pressure, New Study Finds.
The study was conducted by researchers with the Cleveland Clinic and Quest Diagnostics, and were published in the journal ‘Circulation’ on Dec. 6.
We wanted to know, was their blood pressure changing during the pandemic?, Dr. Luke Laffin, Lead Study Author,
via ‘The New York Times’.
Data revealed a rise in blood pressure of
more than half a million people in 2020
once the pandemic hit in March.
We observed that people weren’t exercising as much during the pandemic, weren’t getting regular care, were drinking more and sleeping less, Dr. Luke Laffin, Lead Study Author,
via ‘The New York Times’.
Analysts say the results of the study are
“very important,” but “not surprising.”.
Even small changes in
average blood pressure in
the population … , Dr. Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, American Heart Association, via ‘The New York Times’.
… can have a huge impact on the number of strokes, heart failure events and heart attacks that we’re likely to be seeing in the coming months, Dr. Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, American Heart Association, via ‘The New York Times’.
While the study found distinctions between the sexes, it was not able to effectively distinguish data amongst race.
We know the pandemic
has hit different cultures and
different aspects of society
in different ways, Dr. Kim Williams, Rush University Medical Center,
via ‘The New York Times’.
Analysts point to the break down of consistent medical care as a contributing factor of the study’s findings.
I think a critical piece is that we know so many people lost contact with the health care system, and lost control of blood pressure
and diabetes, Dr. Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, American Heart Association, via ‘The New York Times’.
Health professionals also reiterate the effects that individual poor health has on the public at large.
There are also public health consequences from not seeing your doctor regularly, making poor dietary choices and
not exercising, Dr. Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, American Heart Association, via ‘The New York Times’.
If we think about the long-term implications, that’s potentially more profound, Dr. Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, American Heart Association, via ‘The New York Times’

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